The need for a global vision of planetary unity and purpose for humanity as a whole…

The Overview Effect 

“For more than four decades, astronauts from many cultures and backgrounds have been telling us that, from the perspective of Earth orbit and the Moon, they have gained such a vision.  There is even a common term for this experience:  ‘The Overview Effect’, a phrase coined in the book of the same name by space philosopher and writer Frank White. It refers to the experience of seeing firsthand the reality of the Earth in space, which is immediately understood to be a tiny, fragile ball of life, hanging in the void, shielded and nourished by a paper-thin atmosphere.  From space, the astronauts tell us, national boundaries vanish, the conflicts that divide us become less important and the need to create a planetary society with the united will to protect this ‘pale blue dot’ becomes both obvious and imperative.  Even more so, many of them tell us that from the Overview perspective, all of this seems imminently achievable, if only more people could have the experience!”

Read more here.

Or watch the beautiful film “Overview” here.

How to apply the brain science of resilience to the classroom

Neuroscience isn’t on many elementary school lesson plans. But this spring, a second grade class at Fairmont Neighborhood School in the South Bronx is plunging in.

Sarah Wechsler, an instructional coach with wide eyes and a marathoner’s energy, asks the students to think about the development and progress that they’ve made already in their lives.

Read full NPR article here.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

For a more sustainable planet, let us all back the goals of the Paris agreement. Get involved.

I commit to:
– buying nothing new, except food
– not to eat meat
– refusing plastic bags and cups
– not buying plastic bottles
for the next month.

 

How to meditate

Meditation is a simple practice available to all, which can reduce stress, increase calmness and clarity and promote happiness. Learning how to meditate is straightforward, and the benefits can come quickly. Here, the New York Times offers basic tips to get you started on a path toward greater equanimity, acceptance and joy. Take a deep breath, and get ready to relax.

Go placidly amid the noise

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Continue reading “Go placidly amid the noise”

Do one thing at a time

1.    Do one thing at a time
2.    Know the problem
3.    Learn to listen
4.    Learn to ask questions
5.    Distinguish sense from nonsense
6.    Accept change as inevitable
7.    Admit mistakes
8.    Say it simple
9.    Be calm
10. Smile

How to work better, by Peter Fischli & David Weiss